It's been 32 years since the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, and 25 years since the deadly mishap in Chernobyl made the public understand what a "nuclear meltdown" might actually mean.  This first video trailer will get you in touch with the inner dread that we all felt back then. While it may be fictional, the scenario it portrays is very real, and has always been a possibility, and this film very much shaped the minds and attitudes of millions who are still deeply suspicious of nuclear energy. (Note: this is a trailer is really not  the clip I wanted. I am still trying to find that one and will republish when I find it). The second trailer gives you a taste of the aftermath of Chernobyl. It's followed by a professor's explanation of a meltdown, as well as the issues of storing nuclear waste.(The problem the industry most hates to talk about.)

The nuclear energy industry, and their right wing partners, have always tried to minimize the risks of nuclear power generation to younger people, and they work hard to present any hazard as mere paranoia marketed by a liberal elite, which they portray as hostile to economic growth. But the dangers have always been very real, and strategically marginalized through skilled propaganda. The critics of the industry have been vilified, even mocked, simply for informing the public of the ugly truths which the industry has expended great effort trying to conceal.

It seems that the Japanese disaster may be even closer to this outcome than those moments were. If you have a god, pray to it. If you don't, just hope we dodge this bullet, too, as we have dodged so many over the years. Whether by nuclear calamity, or climate change negligence, corporate and conservative greed, enabled by a complete lack of meaningful oversight and accountability, may well be taking our planet on a steady march down a reckless road to planetary ruin.

 

 

 

Latest News On Japanese Nuclear Accident

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Background

 

Got links?  Please tweet them to @shoq. I will add them here.

News

Warnings, Alerts and Information

Disaster Relief

  • Give $10 automatically to the REDCROSS by texting to: 90999. Note: Regardless of what current message says, all proceeds do go to Red Cross. Details
     
  • Other Red Cross methods

Missing Persons

Inquiries concerning U.S. citizens living or traveling in Japan should be referred to the U.S. Department of State, Office of Overseas Citizens Services at:

1-888-407-4747 or 202 647-5225.

For inquiries about relatives living in Japan who are not US citizens, encourage the members of your community to keep calling or to try contacting other family members who live in the region. Even though communication networks overloaded right now, the situation may change and access to mobile networks and the internet may improve.

The Google Person Finder site is available at: http://japan.person-finder.appspot.com/?lang=en

Source: Red Cross

Video and Images

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   Backgrounders

   Political Implications

US President Ronald Reagan once flatly declared, “Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” A quarter of a century has since passed, and a huge price has now fallen due in the form of a once-in-a-century crisis. It has compelled people to learn once again that government is indispensable for dealing with the unstable nature of capitalism
 

Rumblings of Boycotts are Not Boycotts

As I suspected would happen, the Koch boycott idea is gaining traction fast. That's why I hacked together this primer last week, hoping to encourage and/or report on more formalized embodiments of the idea as they emerged. I still haven't learned of one worth repeating, but I expect to any day now.

The Koch Industries Empire is Vast

Koch Industries is one of the two largest privately owned companies in America, with holdings in almost every industry sector, but energy and paper are two very big interests.

I am leery of tossing around the B-word casually, but as @Stopbeck proved, there are many kinds of boycott-type consumer actions, and when properly conceived and executed, they can be and have been effective.  And while it's certainly easier to bring pressure on public companies, even private empires hate losing money.

While coal and electricity are tough to boycott, Koch has many other revenue streams. Some associates and I have been working on a robust database of products and brands that would be useful for a real boycott against Koch. In the meantime, this list, by Daily Kos write Geebeebee, provides a pretty good glimpse of the big products in this empire of evil:

As always, your Retweets help a lot. See the button below.

The Products of Koch Industries

Georgia-Pacific
Consumer products
Georgia Pacific
Building products
Invista®
Products
Angel Soft toilet paper
Brawny paper towels
Dixie plates, bowls, napkins and cups
Mardi Gras napkins and towels
Quilted Northern toilet paper
Soft 'n Gentle toilet paper
Sparkle napkins
Vanity fair napkins
Zee napkins
Georgia-Pacific paper products and envelop
Dense Armor Drywall and Decking
ToughArmor Gypsum board
Georgia pacific Plytanium Plywood
Flexrock
Densglass sheathing
G/P Industrial plasters (some products used by a lot of crafters)
   Agricultural Plaster
   Arts & Crafts Plaster
   Dental Plaster
   General Purpose Plaster
   Glass-reinforced Gypsum (GRG)
   Industrial Tooling Plaster
   Investment Casting Plaster
   Medical Plaster
   Metal Casting Plaster
   Pottery Plaster

FibreStrong Rim board
G/P Lam board
Blue Ribbon OSB Rated Sheathing
Blue Ribbon Sub-floor
DryGuard Enhanced OSB
Nautilus Wall Sheathing
Thermostat OSB Radiant Barrier Sheathing
Broadspan Engineered Wood Products
XJ 85 I-Joists
FireDefender Banded Cores
FireDefender FS
FireDefender Mineral Core
Hardboard and Thin MDF including Auto Hardboard,
Perforated Hardboard and Thin MDF
Wood Fiberboard –
Commercial Roof Fiberboard
Hushboard Sound Deadening Board
Regular Fiberboard Sheathing
Structural Fiberboard Sheathing

COMFOREL® fiberfill
COOLMAX® fabric
CORDURA® fabric
DACRON® fiber
POLYSHIELD® resin
SOLARMAX® fabric
SOMERELLE® bedding products
STAINMASTER® carpet
SUPPLEX® fabric
TACTEL® fiber
TACTESSE® carpet fiber
TERATE® polyols
TERATHANE® polyether glycol
THERMOLITE® fabric
PHENREZ® resin
POLARGUARD® fiber and
LYCRA® fiber

The Koch Brand Logos To Watch For (And Avoid)

Boycotts and Strikes Are Never Easy Projects

Again, I suspected the Koch boycott idea would pick up speed as the Wisconsin protests continued to grow. But until I see a real (organized and funded) project that can make do a sustained effort, I'm going to refrain from saying there's a real boycott under way. And while I think one would be important, I would much rather spend my energies with the general strike idea, something I have been advocating for many years.  It's our best available tool if we are to ever really get serious about challenging the plutocratic regime that has seized the United States, while everyone was busy working for it.

I created this short URL (http://j.mp/genstrike) to give folks some background about general strikes. I plan to write a full-blown primer soon.

About Koch Industries

Koch Industries, (pronounced "coke"), is the largest privately owned company in the United States with 70,000 employees and annual sales of $100 billion in the fiscal year ending December of 2008. [1] Cargill comes in second for privately owned companies. Operations include refining, chemicals, process and pollution control equipment, technologies, fibers and polymers, commodity and financial trading and consumer products. The company operates crude gathering systems and pipelines across North America. One subsidiary processes 800,000 barrels of crude oil daily in its three refineries.
 — SourceWatch

About Boycotts

"The consumer boycott is the only open door in the dark corridor of nothingness down which farm workers have had to walk for many years. It is a gate of hope through which they expect to find the sunlight of a better life for themselves and their families."  Cesar Chavez

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