Occupy Wall Street, The 30 Second Commercial

Over ten days ago on Twitter, I was saying that the criticism that the #OccupyWallStreet protest “needed a message” in its early days was nonsense. Americans, nay, most citizens of the world already knew what the message was.  And that message was this:

“The 99% have a very big problem, and the 1% better address that problem soon, or things are going to get pretty ugly for everyone.”

Nope, the problem was definitely not the message. Not then, and not now. This Occupy Wall Street wake-up call to America is really so very clear and simple, this just-released video shows just how easy it is to get that message out. (I  continue below the fold after you’ve watched it.)

See? Messages are easy!

Blog posts, tweets, and videos like this are a snap for anyone who knows the problem.  And there’s a lot of those around, and soon they will be making hundreds if not thousands of such expressive message pieces all over the world. In fact, they probably made 100 of them as I typed this sentence.

And they should. But messaging about the problem is merely messaging about the problem.

Messages about the problem are not messages about the solution

The much bigger hurdle #OWS (and all of us) face is the problem of building bridges between the expressions of the message, and the policies and laws that can be enacted to respond to the messages in a free and still modestly democratic society.  And that is an outcome that most mature citizens that I know still value highly, and would like to see evolve to respond to this challenge. They don’t want to toss the baby of civilization out with the bathwater of global corporatism.

Change is good. Too much change is a Mad Max movie, and not everyone looks good in rich dystopian leather.

The long term solution (and even if the short term, if you get off your asses and drag people to vote-in some real change candidates), is to @OccupyCongress.  Unless you have a better near-term legislative body with it’s own military that we need to hear about, it remains our most immediate path to building a new tomorrow with the tools which our ancestors died building for us yesterday.

And if you think just @OccupyWallSt or even an @OccupyCongress movement can produce lasting revolution and social justice on a broad scale? Well, you might want to look into present day Egypt  for another kind of wake up call.

It’s all pretty easy on paper and via Twitter and Facebook. But making civilization work using actual civilizations is a whole lot trickier.

See Also

  • http://twitter.com/BlueTrooth Rich Baska

    I’m beginning to feel like a “flux capacitor” with regard to OWS…a bit of “Back to the Future” humor. Back to the future is somewhat relevant though. I see OWS as the messenger in much the same way that the protests of the 60′s and 70′s gave voice to the disenfranchised, the disgruntled and the disillusioned. I’m personally not that interested in the “solutions” that OWS may offer, nor do I see any need for the “movement” to focus their energy on solutions. The obvious answer to creating change is to maximize voter participation and education. OWS can provide a rich resource for educating voters on the core issues and motivating citizens to express their views at the ballot box. Too boring? Too conventional?
    A big part of the debate surrounding the purpose of OWS has been this temptation to view it as a “counter-movement” to the Tea Party. It’s not as far as I can tell, though it may diminish the impact of the far right. It’s debatable whether OWS is even a political movement. In my opinion, it seems to be rooted in social and cultural issues that are impacted by politics and government. The broader message that I’m hearing is that our humanity has been set aside and our focus has moved away from improving and perfecting our society. All too often, the primary focus has become the “nation” and our “prosperity”, both relevant but sterile and steeped in conformity rather than diversity.
    For myself, I’ll be satisfied that OWS raises the level of our discourse beyond soundbites and bumperstickers. That in itself would have a significant impact in moving our Society toward justice and true opportunity for individuals to utilize, share and contribute the most of their potential.

  • Penny Fortner

    Until “contributions” to those who run our government from big corporations are forbidden, there will be no justice or financial remedy for the rest of us.  I love the tenets upon which our government was originally founded but am, like the rest of you, appalled by what it has become.  An old saying comes to mind……….
    “we have the best government money can buy.”  I believe that’s the long and short of it, unfortunately.

  • Logogogo

    Overthrowing a government, a dictatorship or any system, is the easy part. Building one that works afterwards is where the rubber meets the road. There have been so many useless “revolutions” in so many countries that topple one corrupt regime just to have it replaced by another corrupt regime, sometimes worse than the one it toppled. We as a mature democracy should learn from these mistakes and not make the same ones. We have a somewhat decent system that “works” albeit with some serious shortcomings. We should not, like the author said, throw out the baby with the bathwater. If corporations have been able to game and infiltrate the system and the government to sway it in their direction and benefit themselves; there’s no reason we the people, can’t do the same to our advantage. We have the numbers, we have the desire. The mechanisms and tools are there. We *still* live in a somewhat functioning democracy. Let’s take advantage of that. This needs to work WITHIN the existing system, not overthrow it. It needs to change it and improve it, not abolish it.

  • Logogogo

    Overthrowing a government, a dictatorship or any system, is the easy part. Building one that works afterwards is where the rubber meets the road. There have been so many useless “revolutions” in so many countries that topple one corrupt regime just to have it replaced by another corrupt regime, sometimes worse than the one it toppled. We as a mature democracy should learn from these mistakes and not make the same ones. We have a somewhat decent system that “works” albeit with some serious shortcomings. We should not, like the author said, throw out the baby with the bathwater. If corporations have been able to game and infiltrate the system and the government to sway it in their direction and benefit themselves; there’s no reason we the people, can’t do the same to our advantage. We have the numbers, we have the desire. The mechanisms and tools are there. We *still* live in a somewhat functioning democracy. Let’s take advantage of that. This needs to work WITHIN the existing system, not overthrow it. It needs to change it and improve it, not abolish it.

  • Hollyann

    I am so PROUD of you! This message was so just, so American. Please help us keep it together when we are challenged with fake and insidious infiltrations. We all need cameras, thousands of cameras, so the whole world is watching. You speak with clarity and a sense of real understanding and leadership. This is what we, the 99%, have needed for so long. Thank you. I am 51 yds old, and I will never forget this, ever. @hollyann

  • Paradise Gray

    Free Music Download: Occupy (We The 99) by Jasiri X – http://jasirix.bandcamp.com/track/occupy-we-the-99

  • Anonymous

    So what are you doing along the lines of your own argument?

    • bernard gross

      WHEN I JOINED THE MILITARY OVER30 YEARS AGO, I ENLISTED TO SERVE MY COUNTRY NOT JUST THE STATE OF VA. BUT THE USA. IF THE POLITIANS DID LIKE WISE .WE WOULD BE A BETTER NATION.IT TOOK ME 20 OR MORE YEARS TO GET HALF PAY AND YOU SERVE 1 TERM IN OFFICE AND GET A RETIREMENT CHECK FOR LIFE. IT IS NO SURPRISE THAT YOUR SOLE OBJECTIVE IS TO GET RELECTED.